Holiday Season Can Be Challenging For Those With Depression - Archived


  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For More Information:
Sharon Hershberger, Director, Public Affairs
606.330.6009
[email protected]

 Holiday season can be challenging for those with depression

 

London, Ky. (December 12, 2014)—For the nearly 24 percent of Kentuckians who’ve reported suffering from depression in their lifetime, the holidays can be an especially challenging time. With the extra stress and pressures of holiday gatherings, gift giving and more, some find their mental health may worsen during this time when joy is the common expectation. Saint Joseph London, part of KentuckyOne Health, is working to ensure that the needed mental health services are available for Laurel County residents.

Women are 70 percent more likely than men to experience depression during their lifetime. While major depressive disorder can develop at any age, the average age of onset is 32, according to the U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates by Demographic Characteristics.

“Depression is more than just a case of the blues and unfortunately, the holidays can be a time when depression is at its worst,” said Shelley Stanko, M.D., with KentuckyOne Health Primary Care and Chief Medical Officer at Saint Joseph London. “If you feel that something is amiss, a visit to your primary care physician is a good place to start to get the help you need.”

Depression can surface with a number of signs and symptoms and may include feelings of self-loathing or poor self worth; changes in sleep – either being unable to sleep or sleeping too much; experiencing negative thoughts that you’re unable to shake; changes in appetite – eating too much or not eating enough; showing signs of irritability; short temper or aggressive behavior; or loss of interest in things and activities.

“While we don’t know what exactly causes depression, it’s been linked to a number of genetic, biological, environmental and psychological factors,” said Sunil Chhibber, M.D., psychiatrist and clinical director at Our Lady of Peace, part of KentuckyOne Health. “Depression often coexists with other serious illnesses like cancer, heart attacks or Parkinson’s Disease. It’s important to recognize the signs of mental illness and seek professional help.”

While depression is the most common, affecting nearly seven percent of U.S. adults, there are more than 200 classified forms of mental illness. Among the most common disorders are depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, anxiety and dementia. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), in 2012 an estimated 43.7 million adults (age 18 and older) experienced some form of mental illness in the U.S. in the past year. This represents 18.6 percent of adults. Nearly 181,000 adults in Kentucky suffer from some form of serious mental illness.

Help is available in Laurel County. The Laurel County Mental Health Support Group’s next meeting will be held on December 18 at 6:30 at the New Faith Community Church, located at 825 S. Laurel Road in London. The group is lead by facilitator Sara Parman, A.P.R.N., and is open to those struggling with mental issues, but also to family and caregivers, mental health advocates and mental health professionals. For more information, call 606.330.7388.

According to NIMH, suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S., and the second leading cause of death for Kentuckians ages 15-34. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, it’s important to seek help immediately by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1.800.273.TALK (8255). Learn more at www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

About KentuckyOne Health
KentuckyOne Health, the largest and most comprehensive health system in the Commonwealth, has more than 200 locations including, hospitals, physician groups, clinics, primary care centers, specialty institutes and home health agencies in Kentucky and southern Indiana. KentuckyOne Health is dedicated to bringing wellness, healing and hope to all, including the underserved.  The system is made up of the former Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare and Saint Joseph Health System, along with the the University of Louisville Hospital and James Graham Brown Cancer Center. KentuckyOne Health is proud of and strengthened by its Catholic, Jewish and academic heritages.

 ###

  Depression and Mental Health

 

  • Major depressive disorder is one of the most common mental illnesses, affecting 6.7 percent of U.S. adults, according to National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). 
  • Kentucky ranks among the worst states for depression. Nearly 24 percent of Kentuckians have reported suffering from depression in their lifetime. 
  • Signs and symptoms of depression include:
    - self-loathing or poor self worth
    - changes in sleep – either being unable to sleep or sleeping too much
    - experiencing negative thoughts that you’re unable to shake
    - changes in appetite – eating too much or not eating enough
    - showing signs of irritability
    - short temper or aggressive behavior
    - loss of interest in things and activities. 
  • Women are 70 percent more likely than men to experience depression during their lifetime. 
  • Major depressive disorder can develop at any age, but the average age of onset is 32, according to the U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates by Demographic Characteristics. 
  • Although physicians aren’t exactly sure what causes depression, they have linked it to genetic, biological, environmental and psychological factors. 
  • Depression often coexists with other illnesses, such as cancer, heart attacks or Parkinson’s disease. 
  • According to NIMH, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S., and the second leading cause of death for Kentuckians ages 15-34. 
  • In 2012 (most recent data available), there were an estimated 43.7 million adults (age 18+) with some form of mental illness in the U.S. in the past year.  This represents 18.6 percent of adults. 
  • Close to 181,000 adults live with a serious mental illness in Kentucky, according to the National Alliance on Mental Health. 
  • There are more than 200 classified forms of mental illness, but among the most common disorders are depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, anxiety and dementia.

 

 

 

Publish Date: 

Friday, December 12, 2014